Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Here you can find some good examples of Airlift powered ponds.

Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Postby Pssymon » Tue 07 Mar 2017, 1:50:58

A number of members on the Belgian site have given us permission to translate and share their Airlift powered pond builds here.
We will add more builds in the future, that way we will have a collection of professional examples showing how to implement Airlift technology.

The first pond build we will be sharing is Gino's build (Koi.Gin), which was started in 2010.
At that time, this was the first Airlift driven pond that used a drum filter.

Since the original topic is so large, I will update this topic a number of times until it is complete. I will do the same thing with the next topics that will be shared here.
Feel free to comment or ask any questions you may have.



The Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter
By Koi.Gin



After preparing the garden, the dry-suction system had to be placed.
This prevents groundwater seeping up during the build.

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The next photo shows the drilling of the holes where the suction lines will be placed.

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After that, these rods are placed into the ground.

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This all connects to this pump.

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Starting the digging on friday.

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The digger has done a great job considering the available space.
This was the result, by now it is saturday afternoon.

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Due to heavy rainfall, a temporary cover has to be built first. A job that takes a lot of time, but this is necessary for the following two days.
On sunday morning the PVC piping was placed in the pond.

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Gino's brother (Mario) and father in law are helping with the build.

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Here you can see the three drains coming together in what will be the sump pit.

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Mario built a concrete formwork that will serve two purposes.
Firstly, this will keep the pipes in place while pouring concrete.
Secondly, a deeper space is created which will become the sump pit.

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Meanwhile a lot of rain kept falling. Even with the dry-suction system working fine, the rain was too much. This sadly led to cave-ins.

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This was not all, the wall on the right on the last photo caved in as well...
This had to be fixed quickly as the concrete trucks were on their way.


Here you can see more of the cave-ins that happened over night, and how this was handled.
Now the rebar netting is placed.

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Meanwhile the concrete truck has arrived.

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Ready to pour the concrete.

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A total of 7 m³ of concrete has been poured in the pond. Later, another 3 m³ will be added for the filter area.

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Wednesday, august 18.
At 6:40 AM another big truck arrives.

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14 packs of concrete blocks have been delivered.


The bricklaying starts on the same day:

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Marc coming over to check on the progress:

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The result after the first day:

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The guys from Zen-Koi have done a good job.

Every block had to be moved to the pond floor by hand, the blocks could not be delivered directly to the pond.


The result after the second day of bricklaying:

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Another photo of the cave-in due to the rain.

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Continuing late into the evening.

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The pond takes shape:

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The next morning, concrete is added to the filter area.

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The next day the concrete formwork is taken off the sump pit.

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An Airliftcollector will be placed next to the sump pit.

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Meanwhile, the pond has been built up to the final height.
Later some plateaus will be created where boulders will be placed.
The returns into the pond have been fiberglassed beforehand.

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Before the edge of the pond can be finished, the skimmers have to be placed.
The following pictures show how the skimmers have been converted to 110mm.


The parts required are as follows:
A skimmer, a 160mm sock, and a 110 / 160 reducer.

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The skimmer is converted to 110mm.

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All rubber gaskets are removed and everything is glued together with Tangit All Pressure pvc glue.

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In this picture the skimmer has been installed.

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Continuing with building the filter:

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After that the edge can be worked on again.

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To be continued in the next update!
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Re: Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Postby Pssymon » Sat 08 Apr 2017, 0:33:09

Part two:


Before continuing the build, here you can see how the transits were made.
Three Airlift returns were made in total. Two 110mm returns and one 160mm return.
The pipes were cut at an angle, sanded and degreased. After that they were coated in a layer of g4.

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Mario helping out again.

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Now the Airlift collector will be put in place, It's quite a job.

Here you can see the collector, ready to be placed. The collector has a 400mm diameter and is 200cm long.

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And how would you place this two meters deep..

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Mario is satisfied with the result.

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The first part of the return is ready to be glued together.

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There is a two centimeter level difference between the return at the collector and the return at the pond, this is done to prevent airbubbles getting trapped.

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Now the outlets of the filter have to be connected to the collector.

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The result:

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The next photos show how the skimmers have been placed in the plateaus. Later, large boulders will be placed there as well.

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The Airlift returns, one 110mm and one 160mm.
The 160mm return will connect to the membrane disk-Airlift, which should give 28000 litres an hour.

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The next photo shows the layout of the pond next to the filter. The higher part of the filter will be camouflaged with boulders as well.

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The pond floor is being plastered:

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These pictures give a whole view:

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Here you can see the filter room being polyestered.

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This space will later be filled with K1 media (moving bed).

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Applying polyester and topcoat in these small spaces is a difficult job, with all these transits.

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The last filtercompartment has 3 transits, all 160mm. This is done to ensure enough flow to the collectors.

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The return on the left has already been connected to the 400mm collector.


A one meter deep trench makes it possible to place the 160mm pipes. The pipes are placed on top of eachother.

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Now a big hole to place the collectors is needed.
A hole of 100 x 70 x 230cm deep is needed, which is quite a big task.
After Gino's wife and brother had started digging, it was up to him to finish the dig:

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The filter returns are connected to the 160mm pipes.

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The 160mm pipes:

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In the next photo, the inlets have been connected to the collectors.

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One return has been connected to the pond, this return enters the pond at half depth.

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The result:

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Next, the returns and piping will be surrounded with stabilizing sand. After that, it will be filled up with soil.


Joey, from Zenkoi, has been busy and now the pond itself has been coated with polyester.

This is the result:

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Meanwhile another truck has arrived.

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And it's bringing the boulders needed for the edge of the pond.

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This one weighs in at over 1000kg.

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Some more:

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Also comes with a couple of wheelbarrows full of sand..

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When the truck arrived and dropped off all the boulders, there was a big problem. The boulders had to be placed by hand as it was impossible to use a small crane.
Luckily this was managed by placing multiplex plates in the garden which made it possible to use a pallet transporter to move them next to the pond.
The boulders had to be carefully placed, one by one, to prevent damage to the topcoat. Considering the weight of these boulders, this was a difficult job that took many hours.
After placing the boulders, they were sealed at the bottom with watertight concrete.

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Here you can see that Joey is removing the sharp edges from the boulders so the koi won't hurt themselves.
The skimmers have been hidden in the edge and are almost invisible.

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All credit goes to Joey and Patrick for finishing this tough job!


Here you can see the boulders pointed up, coated with primer, polyester and topcoat. (The part that will be submerged later.)

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The end is near.
Soon the pond will be ready to be filled!

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Finally the time has come to fill:

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Exactly 20 hours later the tap is closed again, at this point the pond is filled with 23000 litres of water. There was no point in filling it any further as there were some pipes that still had to be connected.


Some pictures when the pond was nearly fully filled later:

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Re: Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Postby Frank » Mon 10 Apr 2017, 22:27:16

Well done! :P
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Re: Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Postby scruffy.thedog » Fri 09 Jun 2017, 14:09:01

Koi.gin

How are you finding the drum and flow rates ...Is there a drop in flow as the drum has to be higher than the water level ?
which drum did you use?
how high is the drum above the pond?

Cheers

ian
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Re: Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Postby Pssymon » Sun 11 Jun 2017, 20:16:27

Hi Ian,

Gino is not a member on this site, just on the Belgian site.
I am translating his topic for this site. There is still much more to come as this is a very large and detailed build.
I will update here in the coming days, which will probably answer your questions, if not I can always contact Gino and ask him.

Greetings.
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Re: Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Postby Pssymon » Tue 01 Aug 2017, 1:15:35

Part three


We will continue with some more info about the Airlifts being used in this pond:

- The pond will have four Airlifts in total.
- One pressure chamber Airlift will be used to run the two skimmers. This Airlift will run on one 20w air pump, each skimmer should take about 6000 liters an hour.
- The 160mm outlet in the pond will be powered by a membrane disk Airlift.
- The pond has another two 110mm inlets, one of which was planned to have a turbo (showerhead) Airlift. Due to time constraints this will be a pressure chamber Airlift for now.


More pictures:

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At this point the pressurepump for the drum and the membrane disk Airlift have been connected.
The pond has been filled up to 3cm under the edge and now holds 48000 liters of water.
The filter, piping and collectors are now also filled with water. This adds another 5900 liters.
This makes the total volume 53900 liters.

The drum filter has ran for the first time, with fantastic flow. Although the sieve in the drum is very fine (40 micron) the water level only drops by less than 1,5cm in the filter.
Once the Japanese matting is placed this will change, but still a good result.



A couple of pictures of the inside of the drum:

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The pictures below show the filter drains at on the left, the vertical pipes are the three bottom drains and the skimmers.

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The formwork can now be dismantled. The 110mm pipes all run through a template that was made beforehand.
This way the positioning is perfect, which will aid in the work that has to be done later.

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The filter drains are closed off with 90mm gate valves.

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To make sure everything can be detached later, three part couplings are used.

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The bottom drains all have gate valves, the first part of the coupling is in place here.

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These T-pieces will later have a VDL valve connected in order to flush the drains.

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The result:

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Mario helping again:

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By using this board, these three all measure exactly the same. This makes them interchangeable.

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The result:

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Assembled:

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The PVC material that is required to connect the bottom drains to the drum is ready.
Now, a prefilter needs to be built.

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On the photo below a 250mm pipe has been connected with a rubber gasket, and secured with Tec 7. This perfectly connects to the drum.

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On to the other side.
Everything is connected on site to make sure it all lines up.

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The bottom drains are now connected to the prefilter using the three part couplings.
All different parts are spaced 18mm apart, by using the same piece of wood when connecting them.

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Valterra valves seal between the bottom drains and the filter.

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Of course the wooden prefilter will be sealed by fibreglassing it.
But first the transits have to be connected and bolt holes have to be drilled to connect them.

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The transits will be placed in the milled area, after that only the excess pipe on the inside of the container needs to be sawn off to get an even finish.

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The top opening will connect to the skimmerline.





The prefilter itself has been constructed with multiplex, and will have two layers of 300 gr fibreglass with sufficient resin on the inside and outside. After that it will be finished with a layer of topcoat.

Working on the inside:

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Here the side with the transits has been removed in order to properly work on the 250mm pipe.

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Once the hard to reach places have been fibreglassed, the side with the transits can be placed back and the process can continue.

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This picture shows the sunk transits, the excess pipe has already been removed here.

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Aside from the drain, some space has been reserved for the placement of a Matala mat, this is why the drain is not centered.

The endresult:

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The only thing left to do now is applying the topcoat.




Work is started on the outside of the container, the valves all have been covered with plastic bags to keep them clean.

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Followed by the inside.

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By using the 250mm transit as a stand, it's possible to coat the whole prefilter in one sitting.

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The final product:

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The prefilter has now been placed.
It's easy to connect the bottom drains with the prefilter by using the three part couplings.
A valve to flush is still required, this will be connected on site.

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After a couple of hours, this is the result.
The three bottom drains are connected and the prefilter now has a 63mm drain which connects to the drain (110mm) coming from the drum filter.

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Some more pictures:

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Re: Airlift powered pond with a Drum filter, by Koi.Gin

Postby Pssymon » Tue 07 Nov 2017, 3:08:15

Part four



The small funnel has been replaced by this small collector, to achieve this a 63mm transit was made in a 160mm tube.
Via a 50mm pipe the pond can overflow into the sewer. On the left, a 32mm transit has been made which is sealed with a cap. This will be used to drop the water level in the collector while working on the water level control.

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The pipe on the far right, which is pointed downward, is coming from the submersible pump.

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The water level in the collector is a couple of centimeters lower, as the drains had just been flushed.

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Another photo of the prefilter:

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The transit into the moving bed filter is 250mm, this can take a lot of flow.

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About two weeks ago, a large Japanese cherry tree was blooming in the garden. A very pretty sight, but afterwards the flower petals all end up in the pond.
This meant it was time to install the skimmer.
As you may guess, it will be powered by an Airlift.
As shown in this topic, the bottom drains as well as the skimmer all connect to the prefilter. This means there is no seperate filterline for the skimmer. To regulate the yield of the skimmer, the Airlift will push the water into the prefilter. This way the envisioned yield is guaranteed. The yield is still adjustable by the way, by adjusting the airflow coming from the pump.
Gino's brother Mario has come back to help:

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In the photos below you see the connected Airlift.
The way the airline has been set up is temporary, this will be changed in the coming weeks.

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The return of the skimmer Airlift has been placed just below water level.
A 45 degree bend, lightly angled upwards, pushes the petals into the corner of the prefilter, up to 5cm high!

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To reduce the bubbling sound coming from the Airlift, a T-piece with a cap on it was fitted. A 50mm hole has been drilled in the cap which has a small sponge inserted to allow air to escape while dampening the sound.
This photo shows the flow coming from the Airlift well.

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As the weather has been really nice, it's time to start work on the moving bed filter.
At the bottom of the chamber a stainless steel wire mesh will be placed. Mounted on 32mm pvc piping with 1,5mm airholes.
The mesh size used is 5mm, this will block the K1 filter media and provide more than enough flow for the Airlift.

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Around the edges, the mesh is bent at a slight angle to fit snugly in the chamber and prevent any media slipping past.

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On the side of the mesh another piece of mesh is placed vertically, it's purpose will be clear later on:

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Stainless steel bolts connect everything together.

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The mesh is placed onto the PVC frame, a couple of screws keep the mesh in place:

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The vertical piece of mesh was placed by attaching some PVC rings to the chamber wall, by using another stainless steel screw.
The drillhole (which is above water level anyway) is sealed with tec 7.

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A 25mm PVC pipe fits exactly over it:

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Some screws connect the tube and mesh together:

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The mesh is now firmly in place.
Easy, proper and cheap.

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On the left you can see the air supply, a 32mm pressure PVC pipe.
This pipe is removable as the ends are threaded.

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There's also a 3 part coupling at the top.

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Finally, you can see the moving bed working.
I have to add that fine tuning this setup was not an easy task.
The endresult is satisfactory though, no dead spots, everything is tumbling as it should.

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As the filter at this point had just been finished, and Gino didn't want to have a green pond for the entire summer, the decision was made to temporarily close off the filter from the pond and kickstart the filter artificially. After some help from the forum the decision was made to add 100ml of ammonia to the filter, until no nitrite was measured anymore.
More on this later.


The Japanese matting has also been cut to size and fitted into the chamber.
Here you can see the matting, ready to be cut:

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The materials required:

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This handheld circular saw has been fitted with a cutting disk (normally used in an angle grinder). This is a great way to precisely cut Japanese matting.
The wooden board is used as a guide.

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Time to get to it:

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The result:

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Now that the matting is all ready to be fitted, it's time to place them.
To support the matting a frame of 32mm piping was made.

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This is what it looks like placed in the chamber:

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As pig slats were unavailable, this plastic material was used. Affordable and in terms of flow it's even better.

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These easily hook together, here and there an extra screw was used.

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The chamber was fully filled with Japanese matting.
Originally, the plan was to divide the matting between two chambers, the second chamber will remain as an extra open chamber for now.
If problems with the flow occur (too much resistance), the placement of the matting can be changed, if not then the extra chamber will have more matting or different filter media.

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At this point, the filter has been closed from the pond for three weeks. During this time it has been running with ammonia added every day. When the filter was running properly, a submersible UV was quickly placed.
After this, the pond was connected to the filter again. 10 days later the pond was completely clear.

The placement of the UV unit is a temporary solution, as there was little time and patience to get it working.

The UV was placed in the bottom drain's rising tube.
By placing it here, the UV had to be lengthened, to make sure the pond water properly passes the unit.

The result:

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This is how the UV is held in place, thread was tapped in this thick walled 1 inch tube:

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The UV unit perfectly fits in a threaded PVC transit 1 inch/32mm.
By threading the 32mm tube, it's possible to connect them to eachother.

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Three tie wraps keep the light centered.

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Now the light can be placed:

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