Airlifts to pull water around a donut pond

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Ted1234
Posts: 4
Joined: 09 Sep 2019, 03:49

Airlifts to pull water around a donut pond

Post by Ted1234 » 09 Sep 2019, 04:37

Hey Pssymon,

Got my account back :)

I was re reading this thread: viewtopic.php?f=119&t=15819

I’m wondering if you could re link the images from this thread?

This thread is similar to what I would like to do with the pond I am planning. Basically, I’d like to dig a “donut” of water that is 60 feet wide and 10 feet deep at the center (3:1 sides roughly), and has an outside diameter of 400 feet. I would then “dam” a part of the donut, and then use a bunch of airlifts to “pull” water across the dam, such that water flows around the donut.

I’m wondering what setup you’d recommend if I wanted to achieve a roughly 100,000 gph of flow around the donut. I’d prefer to sacrifice a bit of efficiency if I can simplify the setup with fewer airlifts and fewer air pumps to buy, install, and maintain. What do you think?

Also, you mentioned in the other thread of having the right substrate for bacteria to grow. I’m wondering how you might recommend I incorporate this into the donut? The ultimate goal is to recreate a “lake” that is good for both fishing and swimming.

Any thoughts are appreciated!

Ted

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Pssymon
Posts: 166
Joined: 11 Dec 2015, 00:12
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Airlifts to pull water around a donut pond

Post by Pssymon » 12 Sep 2019, 20:32

Hi Ted,

Good to see you back!

I can try to find the images. I may have some saved here. Sadly a lot of older images have stopped working due to the big forum update.
I'm currently swamped with work but I will take a look as soon as possible.

I have some ideas already. But I will get back to you with a more extensive reply.
Could you share a drawing in the meantime? (on a piece of paper or digital, either is fine.)

Your flow goal is possible with around 20 airlifts, and the concept should work judging from how I'm imagining it.
I would like some more details on how you wish to build this exactly, and why you need that huge flow rate.
If you stock the lake normally/lightly all of this may be overkill.

Ted1234
Posts: 4
Joined: 09 Sep 2019, 03:49

Re: Airlifts to pull water around a donut pond

Post by Ted1234 » 13 Sep 2019, 20:42

Hey Pssymon. Thanks for getting back to me. Sorry to hear work is so busy. Nice to have a hobby!

I attached some pictures below. Basically I am thinking a roughly 2 acre pond. The average depth will be around 11 feet, for roughly 7.5 million gallons of water. My thinking is that 100,000 gph gets me roughly a 3 day cycle time on the water. I’m not sure if that is good or bad, just a rough starting point.

The idea is that in the center of the donut I have a “river” that is roughly 400 feet long and 30 feet wide and acts as the filtration system. For 3/4 of the river I am thinking of building a 2 foot deep “marsh” full of Bull Rushes. For 1/4 I am thinking a 1 foot deep “river” with a layer of crushed stone. Separating these two areas I am thinking of pouring a concrete retaining wall, with 20 or so airlifts across the top. Each air lift would go through a wood board so that water would be forced around the pond.

Already I have built a 60’ diameter test pond, and the soil is perfect clay for it. It holds water perfectly. Now my goal is to build this bigger pond. I would like this pond to be “as pristine as possible” for swimming and fishing. My thinking is that to achieve this I would simulate a natural lake, with water flow, a marsh section, and a river section.

My final goal is for it all to be as “low maintenance” as possible. My thinking is that using airlifts for pumping and a natural marsh and river for filtration might help with that.

I have done quite a bit of research over the years, but have had to try to piece together information from different sources on natural swimming ponds, fishing ponds, and airlifts, so I’m curious to hear your thoughts! Also if you have any recommended resources that you think might help, particularly on low maintenance filtration, that would be appreciated also.

Ted

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